I hated the description of my blog again so I got rid of it. I'm going to make a new description.

Don't care what pronouns you call me, but will defend others' rights to choose pronouns.

I'm an artsy, witchy person, I love cats, I watch sci-fi like Babylon 5 and Star Trek, have some health issues, and blah blah, that's good for now...

 

So, you’d think lettuce would be something you could leave out on the counter for a while and not have a cat start eating it.

But, no.

I came back in the kitchen and Patches was happily munching away on it.

Then threw up a few minutes later.

I think fanfiction is literature and literature, for the most part, is fanfiction, and that anyone that dismisses it simply on the grounds that it’s derivative knows fuck-all about literature and needs to get the hell off my lawn.
Most of the history of Western literature (and probably much of non-Western literature, but I can’t speak to that) is adapted or appropriated from something else. Homer wrote historyfic and Virgil wrote Homerfic and Dante wrote Virgilfic (where he makes himself a character and writes himself hanging out with Homer and Virgil and they’re like “OMG Dante you’re so cool.” He was the original Gary Stu). Milton wrote Bible fanfic, and everyone and their mom spent the Middle Ages writing King Arthur fanfic. In the sixteenth century you and another dude could translate the same Petrarchan sonnet and somehow have it count as two separate poems, and no one gave a fuck. Shakespeare doesn’t have a single original plot—although much of it would be more rightly termed RPF—and then John Fletcher and Mary Cowden Clarke and Gloria Naylor and Jane Smiley and Stephen Sondheim wrote Shakespeare fanfic. Guys like Pope and Dryden took old narratives and rewrote them to make fun of people they didn’t like, because the eighteenth century was basically high school. And Spenser! Don’t even get me started on Spenser.
Here’s what fanfic authors/fans need to remember when anyone gives them shit: the idea that originality is somehow a good thing, an innately preferable thing, is a completely modern notion. Until about three hundred years ago, a good writer, by and large, was someone who could take a tried-and-true story and make it even more awesome. (If you want to sound fancy, the technical term is imitatio.) People were like, why would I wanna read something about some dude I’ve never heard of? There’s a new Sir Gawain story out, man! (As to when and how that changed, I tend to blame Daniel Defoe, or the Modernists, or reality television, depending on my mood.)
I also find fanfic fascinating because it takes all the barriers that keep people from professional authorship—barriers that have weakened over the centuries but are nevertheless still very real—and blows right past them. Producing literature, much less circulating it, was something that was well nigh impossible for the vast majority of people for most of human history. First you had to live in a culture where people thought it was acceptable for you to even want to be literate in the first place. And then you had to find someone who could teach you how to read and write (the two didn’t necessarily go together). And you needed sufficient leisure time to learn. And be able to afford books, or at least be friends with someone rich enough to own books who would lend them to you. Good writers are usually well-read and professional writing is a full-time job, so you needed a lot of books, and a lot of leisure time both for reading and writing. And then you had to be in a high enough social position that someone would take you seriously and want to read your work—to have access to circulation/publication in addition to education and leisure time. A very tiny percentage of the population fit those parameters (in England, which is the only place I can speak of with some authority, that meant from 500-1000 A.D.: monks; 1000-1500: aristocratic men and the very occasional aristocratic woman; 1500-1800: aristocratic men, some middle-class men, a few aristocratic women; 1800-on, some middle-class women as well). What’s amazing is how many people who didn’t fit those parameters kept writing in spite of the constant message they got from society that no one cared about what they had to say, writing letters and diaries and stories and poems that often weren’t discovered until hundreds of years later. Humans have an urge to express themselves, to tell stories, and fanfic lets them. If you’ve got access to a computer and an hour or two to while away of an evening, you can create something that people will see and respond to instantly, with a built-in community of people who care about what you have to say.
I do write the occasional fic; I wish I had the time and mental energy to write more. I’ll admit I don’t read a lot of fic these days because most of it is not—and I know how snobbish this sounds—particularly well-written. That doesn’t mean it’s “not good”—there are a lot of reasons people read fic and not all of them have to do with wanting to read finely crafted prose. That’s why fic is awesome—it creates a place for all kinds of storytelling. But for me personally, now that my job entails reading about 1500 pages of undergraduate writing per year, when I have time to read for enjoyment I want it to be by someone who really knows what they’re doing. There’s tons of high-quality fic, of course, but I no longer have the time and patience to go searching for it that I had ten years ago. But whether I’m reading it or not, I love that fanfiction exists. Because without people doing what fanfiction writers do, literature wouldn’t exist. (And then I’d be out of a job and, frankly, I don’t know how to do anything else.)

“As a professor, may I ask you what you think about fanfiction?” (via meiringens)

This.

I really want to write a dissertation on the elements of ‘fanfiction’ and it’s origin in medieval literature… Particularly Welsh. And Arthurian. :D 

Maybe one day… 

(via asnacsociety)

It’s kind of like when someone complains about music sampling, or something else they find “unoriginal” about rap, hip-hop, electronic music, etc, and I’m like, “Here, let me tell you a few things about Baroque opera, where composers often literally took someone else’s work and inserted it into their production.” Some would totally, completely be made up of scenes from existing works.

And though I can’t talk about this as eloquently or authoritatively as a professor, and can’t always manage to bring it up at all, even though I always want to, I have made a few people think over the years.

(Source: inkandcayenne)

lokiel-fallen-god:

celesgami:

idpmirtf:

rearadmiral-comsmocock:

can we just take a moment to realize that not only did it paint an elephant it painted it to give the illusion of depth

I love elephants more than anything

#1: read this
#2: stop reblogging this 
please

we need to keep reblogging so people see your comment and know

I kind of suspected abuse might be involved, because it just isn’t a very “natural” thing for an animal to do. They have means of expression, but they are not the same as humans’.
Of course, I always hoped they were gently encouraged, but how likely would that be? Especially when there is money for humans to gain?

lokiel-fallen-god:

celesgami:

idpmirtf:

rearadmiral-comsmocock:

can we just take a moment to realize that not only did it paint an elephant it painted it to give the illusion of depth

I love elephants more than anything

#1: read this

#2: stop reblogging this 

please

we need to keep reblogging so people see your comment and know

I kind of suspected abuse might be involved, because it just isn’t a very “natural” thing for an animal to do. They have means of expression, but they are not the same as humans’.

Of course, I always hoped they were gently encouraged, but how likely would that be? Especially when there is money for humans to gain?

(Source: 4gifs)

Although Mork and Mindy is I suppose more properly called comedy than sci-fi, it is pretty responsible for a love of sci-fi in my early childhood. Along with the original Star Trek, of course. In some ways maybe more so than Trek, though, because it was more accessible to me at that phase of intellectual development than Trek was.

So, really, to me, Robin Williams will always be a sci-fi star, as well as a comedian. Because Mork was my favorite TV character back then. And he was an alien! I had the lunchbox and everything. (I believe I still have the thermos, but the box itself rusted.)

Actually this was the first I logged on tumblr today. And find out Robin Williams is dead. And that sucks.

queerpotters:

does anyone else feel like they just lost their favourite uncle

Did anybody else have no idea Robin Williams had been found dead yet? Because I haven’t seen news yet today and would’ve had no clue if this post hadn’t been tagged with his name.

koipatches:

the-dark-knightwing:

SPOTLIGHT ON: Mr. Anthony Misiano’s Joker cosplays. Harley’s Joker and Joker’s Harley, they call themselves, and their eye for imitation is uncanny. Lovely job

OMG

WOW

lemonsweetie:

Example of Star Trek Addressing Social Issues - Mental Illness 

This scene got me right in the gut when I first saw it. It was revealed earlier in the episode that Garak suffers from extreme claustrophobia, experiencing a severe attack just a few scenes before this one. I was already expecting Martok and Worf to dismiss Garak’s mental illness, especially because the Klingon Empire prides its people on physical strength. I was waiting for them to call him a coward, not “getting over it” like I’ve heard so many times in my own life about mental illness. But as seen above that’s not what happened, the exact opposite does. Its moments like this that make me love Star Trek, even for all its flaws. Sometimes I get to see past my conditioned reaction of the worst, and get to see the best in people instead.

TDLR; Star Trek may be about aliens in the future, but it connects to me on a human level - more than most modern shows do today. 

daniellemertina:

one of the best lessons you can learn is that you’re valuable and worthy just because you exist. not because of your productivity. or your qualities. or because of how many people like you. or how close you are to societal understandings of attractiveness or success. but just because you are you.  

Quinoa may deliver a complete protein—all of the amino acids you require—in a compact package, but rice and beans together actually do better. And like goji berries, blueberries and strawberries are packed with phytochemicals. The only problem is that lacking an exotic back story, food marketers can’t wring as exorbitant a markup from these staples: The domestic blueberry, for example, is periodically (and justifiably) marketed as a superfood, and in 2012, products featuring blueberries as a primary ingredient saw their sales nearly quadruple. But they only raked in $3.5 million—less than 2 percent of açaí-based product sales.

Tom Philpott, "Are Quinoa, Chia Seeds, and other ‘Superfoods’ a Scam?" (from Mother Jones)

Also worth highlighting is this section:

Worse than superfoods’ origin myths, though, are their effects on the people in their native regions. In 2009, at the height of the açaí berry hype, Bloomberg News reported that the fruit’s wholesale price had jumped 60-fold since the early 2000s, pricing the Amazonian villagers who rely on it out of the market. In the Andes, where quinoa has been cultivated since the time of the Incas, price spikes have turned a one-time staple into a luxury, and quinoa monocrops are crowding out the more sustainable traditional methods.” (emphasis mine)

So not only are the markets for “superfoods” putting the foods out of reach of the people who relied on them as a dietary staple, but there are foods easily accessible to us that deliver all the nutrition at a fraction of the cost, both to our grocery bill and to the social/environmental toll.

(via elenilote)

Re. blueberries, fwiw I eat loads of them but only in the summertime. The rest of the year they are jaw-droppingly expensive. (But I don’t think I’ve ever even *seen* an acai berry….)

(Source: thalassarche)